Today I purchased a new iPad 3

Today I purchased my first tablet computer.
I’ve never felt that I needed one of these, but lately I’ve had a feeling that I spend too much time on my laptop and on my stationary, but the truth is that I do a LOT of reading, and mostly in the format of .pdf e-books.

I believe that purchasing a dedicated reading device for reading proprietary file formats is a complete rip-off, so that was not an option. Besides reading, I watch a lot of pictures from different forums online, and my own and my friend’s photography work, and I don’t think that watching pictures on a low resolution 8″ screen does justice to such work, so I didn’t consider a tablet device for this.

But, the technology does get better, and the latest models of tablets from companies like HTC, Apple and Samsung is getting quite good for watching photos and definitely for reading PDF files! So instead of being dependent on the laptop for doing things like updating my social media connections, watching pictures, reading and writing mail and basic surfing I decided to get a good tablet device. My choice depended on two main factors: performance and screen quality.

After looking at both Galaxy tab, iPad3 and some other models, I choose the latest iPad. I’m used to working on both Apple OS X and iPhone, so the user interface was smooth sailing. Now if you’ve read all this about me getting an iPad, you probably start wondering when I’m getting to the point of this update! Well I’m sorry to say, there is no point! I’m writing this update to test out the keyboard of my new iPad 3!

Have a nice weekend!

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Is there a thing such as “the perfect computer mouse”? I may have found mine…

So what is this post about?

Well it’s about something we all use for several hours every day, that is our most intimate connection to our computer, you guessed it, The Mouse!

I’ve tried MANY different makes and models through the years, without really finding the perfect fit for me.
Well, one time many years ago I had a USB cabled optical mouse from Logitech that was really perfect, but I used it for so many years that I actually wore it out! I tried to get a new one, but the model was out of production off course, so I had to settle with a second best solution.

Since then I’ve tried mice from Logitech, HP, Microsoft and Razor, but never really found an equally good mouse.

This post might seem a bit strange on people who doesn’t have a dedicated companionship with the mouse, but I do, so I’m pretty serious about it. I use the mouse more than most people, as I work in different graphics applications, like Photoshop, Blender and 3DS Max. Most of the time I use my Wacom Intous for most detailed work, but for most regular things I use a standard mouse.
Besides, having a mouse that works great when I have two monitors and constantly keep changing applications and focus can really make a big productivity and comfort difference.

My setup is as said, two monitors and I often watch tutorials or read PDF’s on one screen and work in one or two applications on the other, so the tasks of changing applications and keeping the right focus is very important.

Most of the time I use the Alt+Tab and activate the windows I need, but soon I found that having a dedicated button on the mouse mapped to the Alt+Tab key combo is really practical. So my perfect mouse has to have more than the standard three buttons.

I do a lot of scrolling and paging, so a nice scroll function is also a must on the mouse. I can’t stand the “three lines per tick” scrolling on most mice, as it jumps too long when reading a page, and setting it to scroll one line will get too slow in applications like a web browser. So the ability to scroll smooth without the clicking on the scroll wheel is also a must. I need a “step less” scrolling function where the mouse wheel rolls freely, but with the ability to scroll in steps when needed.

I can’t stand the “Nano” mice, as they get too small for my hand, and the buttons are tiny, so the mouse has to have some decent size.

It has to be comfortable in the hand, with good ergonomic design, not like a lump of plastic with buttons on it.

It has to be wireless, yet precise. I need a good resolution on the DPI.

It has to have good battery life. I hate having to change batteries all the time, plus it hurts the environment.

It has to work on many surfaces. I have to be able to use it while sitting in the sofa and other obscure places.

It has to have configurable buttons with different application profiles. I need to have one button function like the back button in the browser, but like “Undo” in another.

It has to work on both Windows and Mac and possibly on Linux without too many hacks.

This is a lot of demands for a mouse! Does a mouse like this exist, and how much will it cost?

I’ve found only ONE mouse that does all these things. It is the rather unknown Logitech M705 “Marathon Mouse”.
There is one more if you only need Windows support, but I use it equally much on both Windows and Mac.
This is worth some criticism towards Logitech, because if you look at the box it has an OS X logo on it, but it only works as a basic mouse in OS X, without configuration options. That sucks! No extra buttons or anything. GoFigure();

It has all these functions, plus it has a 1000 days battery life! Beat that! 1000 days! That’s like three years… In practice though I doubt it will last that long, but that’s what’s announced from Logitech.

Anyway, if you need a “perfect mouse” with all these properties, you now have the answer for what to buy!

This is the product page for it:
http://www.logitech.com/en-us/mice-pointers/mice/marathon-mouse-m705

Here are some pictures of this incredible Mouse:

I’ve joined LinkedIn! Please help me build a professional comp. sci / CGI network!

Hi there, dear readers of this blog!

I’ve recently joined LinkedIn, and I’m trying to build a network consisting of the best in the computer science, software engineering and CG industries.

I’ve gotten a couple of big fish allready, but my network is still super-tiny!

I’m hoping to use this network for both socializing and for sharing technical issues and to present new thoughts and ideas for future products.

I believe a network fusion of these three industries will be an important avenue for anyone interested in fronting their work on the public arena, absolutely free.

So please join and invite anyone you think should be in there. Anybody with a passion and some talent in any of these three fields are very welcome to join!

So please check my profile and join my network over at:

http://www.linkedin.com/pub/chris-sederqvist/57/713/103/en
Vis Chris Sederqvist sin LinkedIn-profilVis profilen til Chris Sederqvist

Installing Dropbox on Linux with XFCE and Thunar File Manager

I’ve seen many “recipes” for doing this, including installing the nautilus-dropbox, which drags with it many unnecessary dependencies when using a Package Manager.

I use XFCE on Linux, because it is fast, stable and easy to use and expand with plugins. You can get some serious performance gains if your PC is sluggish by switching to XFCE instead of Gnome, KDE or god forbid, Windows!

I also depend upon Dropbox for my “cloud” service, because I need to be able to access and change my files from many different locations.
But by default Dropbox don’t come with a plugin for getting full support on XFCE’s default file manager “Thunar”.

You can install Dropbox “manually” on any Linux distribution, using a precompiled binary. To get and install the correct distribution for your platform you must make sure you have Wget installed, then you can execute these commands in a Terminal shell (or xterm):

32-bit:

cd ~ && wget -O - "https://www.dropbox.com/download?plat=lnx.x86" | tar xzf -
 64-bit:
cd ~ && wget -O - "https://www.dropbox.com/download?plat=lnx.x86_64" | tar xzf -

This will change into your default $home directory and unarchive the needed files there.
BEWARE! The folder is hidden, so you won’t see anything in it called dropbox-dist if you don’t have “show hidden files” enabled, or apply the -a parameter to a ls command.

Now what you need to do is to start the Dropbox “deamon” that runs in the background and synchronizes your files. You do this by either dobble clicking the dropboxd script (NOT DROPBOX BUT DROPBOXD ) or running the following command in your Terminal:

./.dropbox-dist/dropboxd

This wil bring up a window, telling you to enter your credentials or create a new account.
Just follow the prompts to get it going.

Now you need to make sure XFCE starts the deamon each time you log into your account. You can do this in a number of ways, but the graphical way is easy enough for those not too comfortable with Linux. If you know any of the other ways, feel free to use them instead!

Go to your XFCE Menu and choose Settings -> Settings Manager
Then choose “Session and Startup”
Now, give a description and title of your choice, then choose to find a file to add to auto start.
Remember to right click and choose “Show hidden” in the file dialog, then select the “.dropbox-dist” folder and choose dropboxd:
Now you’re ready to use the basic functionality of Dropbox!
Now many tutorials end here, but if you like to have full Dropbox integration into the Thunar file manager, with right-click options. secondary menus, etc you need to download and compile a tiny add-on. Some distributions maybe have this in a Package Manager, but I don’t, so here it goes.
Go to:
And download the thunar-dropbox-0.2.0.tar.bz2 file, and extract it to some folder where you have full permissions.
Make sure you have the thunarx-2 and thunarx-2-dev packages installed in addition to developer packages for regular gcc development, like “build-essential” in Ubuntu etc.  If you get any errors about missing packages / tools, try to install them using your regular routines for installing applications.
Now, change into that folder from your Terminal session. (ex. cd /home/chris/Downloads/thunar-dropbox-0.2.0)
Then do the following:
./waf configure --prefix=/usr
This should produce the following output:

Checking for program gcc or cc : /usr/bin/gcc
Checking for program cpp : /usr/bin/cpp
Checking for program ar : /usr/bin/ar
Checking for program ranlib : /usr/bin/ranlib
Checking for gcc : ok
Checking for thunarx-2 : yes
Checking for gio-2.0 : yes
‘configure’ finished successfully (0.019s)

Now do:

./waf build
sudo ./waf install

Now, log out and in again or restart your computer, and you should be good to go!

 

Have Fun!