Follow-Up: Reasons to NOT only learn .Net / C#

A modern developer should master at least 3 languages!

A while ago I was all exited about finally “getting it” in sense of the more advanced parts of C#, like Generics, Events, Delegates, and Lambdas. So I wrote a post about 18 reasons you should use C# / .Net / Mono.  it kinda sounded like I’d found a salvation in it or something.

Well, I did not. I was just “on a roll”!

I’m often on these rolls. This is what gets me ahead of the competition and it’s what get’s developers with master degrees in Computer Science and programming  asking ME for help while at work from time to time. That’s wicked cool, but it has its downsides.   logoLispSpillerGlossy

I seldom sleep more than 4 hours per night, because I just HAVE to finish up a stupid project so I can understand a concept in a programming language I probably never going to use, like Cobol or something. But who knows right?

This brings me to the main theme of this blog post:

I’ve been interested in programming for a long time. Long before I started to work as a developer, I snuck in some developer tasks when working as a network and security administrator, and when working as a server and system administrator.
I managed to convince my boss that I really needed this and that book  or course so we could do this and that so much better. It worked all the time.

My job back then was basically sitting in my office with a self-made monitoring system that alerted me if some fiber link was down or a router to a branch office went bananas, something that didn’t happen very frequently. So, my responsibility was to make sure the systems ran 24/7, and that was that.
I make it sound a bit easier than it was from time to time, but the point is that I had a lot of time to study programming!

I started learning the C Language from the ubiquitous K&R book that I still keep in sight for the kicks emacs6-256of it. This was the first standardized version of C, so it had some quirks to put it mildly, but when you understood it, nothing could beat it! At least not in terms of efficiency and performance… Time to market is a nother story.
I was doing a good deal of scripting as part of my job, for automating mass installations, upgrades log-on scripts and those things, but that was in VBScript! Can you believe it? VBScript! I hated it.

So I started to replace many of the scripts with Perl and Python using the Win32 libraries, something that was way cooler.

Then I got interested in cross-platform programming in Java, because I missed a real GUI from the stripped out Tk I managed to get out of Perl and Python, and it had to run on both Windows, Linux and FreeBSD servers. While I probably would get a compile-time error writing “Hello World” in Java today I thought it was fun while it lasted.

Then the real shit hit the fan. I decided to change jobs and work as a full-time developer. My responsibilities where diverse and involved working with Legacy Borland C++ code and some C# 2.0 written in C++ style. So I had to get really serious about learning C++ and C#. The first months I went to work, did what I could, then I wrote down everything I didn’t know how to do.
When I got home I thought it to myself through books, tutorials and Googling so I could fix it the next day.

This went on for almost a year, and I was totally up to my neck in deadlines and trouble.
It wasn’t really my vision of having a job doing what I liked most.
But somehow I managed to get by and new projects came along that demanded the same level of commitment.
That’s the price to pay for adding a bit extra on the resume…the-ruby-mine-logo

Today I feel a lot safer about my skills in the “major languages” C, C++ and C#, but I’ve realized that I’ve only been doing one kind of paradigm type programming and that is the Object Oriented type of programming.

So I’ve now started to learn two new languages (or three actually), namely Common Lisp, Erlang and TCL/Tk.
What I discover each day is that the new things I learn about the more functional approach to programming could have saved my ass plenty of times if I’d known some of the same techniques when working with the projects I barely got through earlier,
I could have done many things so much simpler and more elegantly.

So my advice to all aspiring or maybe even more to all the mounted old dogs that refuses to learn new tricks is to actually do just that. Learn at least one purely functional language, one strictly OOP and one that blends it all together, like C++ or Objective-C if that’s your cup of tea. Plus I’d invest in learning one strictly interpreted language like Python or Ruby, as it makes prototyping and easier tasks, well, so much easier!.

erlang

Put a NoSQL database like MongoDB on top of this and you have an incredible toolbox for handling almost any programming task thrown at you. Word.

PS! Don’t forget those that  work hard for free to bring us some fantastic tools to develop cool things with! 

Get a  Member Sponsorship at the Free Software Foundation Today! 

fsfButton     <– LINK!

These guys are Funding the GNU Project.

Until next time, The MadMan.

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